TEST RESTORE IFW IMAGE

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TEST RESTORE IFW IMAGE

Postby AlanD » Fri Oct 04, 2019 9:31 am

I was wondering what methods the members of the group use to test that
an IFL Restore operation can be used to successfully restore an image
made with either IFW or IFL, without any loss or corruption of the
source of the image.

This would be a one-time test to verify that a new installation,
configuration or software is viable.

Also, I am sure, would give a new user the confidence to restore from an
image.

AlanD
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Re: TEST RESTORE IFW IMAGE

Postby Bob Coleman » Fri Oct 04, 2019 1:51 pm

I assume you are talking about an image that contains (at least) an OS partition.

First, I'd use byte-for-byte validate when creating the image, but that's not a test.

I don't know any way to test a restore and guarantee that it was successful without at least minimal risk.

If you have a second disk, you could restore to that.

If you have extra space on the OS disk, you could restore to that.

If you have a multi-boot setup that includes another copy of the OS, you could restore that and test that the restored to partition boots.

Admittedly, I don't know that that absolutely guarantees that a restore to the same location that was imaged will be successful. Long experience leaves me with a high degree of confidence that it will, but having confidence is not the same as testing.
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Re: TEST RESTORE IFW IMAGE

Postby AlanD » Fri Oct 04, 2019 4:41 pm

I remember the first time I had to bite the bullet and trust IFD Restore
to make my OS whole again. It was a big leap of faith for me.

I have never had a Restore failure, and don't give it much thought anymore.

I have never found a way to to do a 'confidence' test that would be
meaningful, but wouldn't it be nice to be able to do that if you wanted
that extra shot of confidence.

AlanD


On 10/04/19 16:51, Bob Coleman wrote:
> I assume you are talking about an image that contains (at least) an OS partition.
>
> First, I'd use byte-for-byte validate when creating the image, but that's not a test.
>
> I don't know any way to test a restore and guarantee that it was successful without at least minimal risk.
>
> If you have a second disk, you could restore to that.
>
> If you have extra space on the OS disk, you could restore to that.
>
> If you have a multi-boot setup that includes another copy of the OS, you could restore that and test that the restored to partition boots.
>
> Admittedly, I don't know that that absolutely guarantees that a restore to the same location that was imaged will be successful. Long experience leaves me with a high degree of confidence that it will, but having confidence is not the same as testing.
>
>

AlanD
 
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Re: TEST RESTORE IFW IMAGE

Postby AlanD » Sat Oct 05, 2019 4:27 pm

On 10/04/19 12:31, AlanD wrote:
> I was wondering what methods the members of the group use to test that
> an IFL Restore operation can be used to successfully restore an image
> made with either IFW or IFL, without any loss or corruption of the
> source of the image.
>
> This would be a one-time test to verify that a new installation,
> configuration or software is viable.
>
> Also, I am sure, would give a new user the confidence to restore from an
> image.
>
> AlanD
>
>
Bit of trouble, but how about making a full backup image, and then to
test the restore process, employ an external blank HDD drive for the
target drive (instead of your OS drive) for the restore process.
This would be bootable, would it not?
[Would require some temp redirection of the boot process in BIOS for
complete verification test].

AlanD

AlanD
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Re: TEST RESTORE IFW IMAGE

Postby Bob Coleman » Sat Oct 05, 2019 5:12 pm

AlanD wrote:

> Bit of trouble, but how about making a full backup image, and then to
> test the restore process, employ an external blank HDD drive for the
> target drive (instead of your OS drive) for the restore process.
> This would be bootable, would it not?

I don't know. Probably depends on the machine.
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Re: TEST RESTORE IFW IMAGE

Postby Brian K » Mon Oct 07, 2019 12:35 am

Alan,

I don't understand what you are trying to accomplish. The best you can do is /vb with the backup and /vb with the restore.
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Re: TEST RESTORE IFW IMAGE

Postby CyberSimian » Mon Oct 07, 2019 1:49 am

AlanD wrote:
> how about making a full backup image, and then to
> test the restore process, employ an external blank HDD drive for the
> target drive (instead of your OS drive) for the restore process.
> This would be bootable, would it not?

If by "external blank HDD" you mean an HDD connected via SATA directly to the motherboard (so that the HDD appears to the motherboard as an internal disk), the answer is "yes".

If by "external blank HDD" you mean an HDD connected via USB, I think that the answer is "no".

You can obviously boot the Windows installer from a USB device (CD/DVD drive or memory stick), but I was under the impression that Microsoft disallow booting an installed system from a removable device. If you could do this, users would purchase only one Windows licence and use it on all of their systems via the removable device. With this Microsoft restriction, users are forced to purchase one Windows licence for each system, thereby ensuring that Microsoft employees and shareholders enjoy an excellent standard of living during their working lives and retirement.

-- from CyberSimian in the UK
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Re: TEST RESTORE IFW IMAGE

Postby AlanD » Mon Oct 07, 2019 8:28 am

On 10/07/19 03:35, Brian K wrote:
> Alan,
>
> I don't understand what you are trying to accomplish. The best you can do is /vb with the backup and /vb with the restore.
>
>
Hi Brian
Just started thinking about the faint-of-heart needing reassurance when
it comes to pushing the button to Restore.

I have a friend who was convinced (by me) a few years ago to buy into
Terabyte apps, and now he has a computer issue, so TB Restore was in
question.

Let's just say that he was was very reluctant to commit, and yes, he had
a successful restore, but I had no way of proving to him that it will work.
As for me, I have done it many times and it always works.
Cheers
AlanD
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Re: TEST RESTORE IFW IMAGE

Postby AlanD » Mon Oct 07, 2019 8:29 am

On 10/07/19 04:49, CyberSimian wrote:
> AlanD wrote:
>> how about making a full backup image, and then to
>> test the restore process, employ an external blank HDD drive for the
>> target drive (instead of your OS drive) for the restore process.
>> This would be bootable, would it not?
>
> If by "external blank HDD" you mean an HDD connected via SATA directly to the motherboard (so that the HDD appears to the motherboard as an internal disk), the answer is "yes".
>
> If by "external blank HDD" you mean an HDD connected via USB, I think that the answer is "no".
>
> You can obviously boot the Windows installer from a USB device (CD/DVD drive or memory stick), but I was under the impression that Microsoft disallow booting an installed system from a removable device. If you could do this, users would purchase only one Windows licence and use it on all of their systems via the removable device. With this Microsoft restriction, users are forced to purchase one Windows licence for each system, thereby ensuring that Microsoft employees and shareholders enjoy an excellent standard of living during their working lives and retirement.
>
> -- from CyberSimian in the UK
>
>
Excellent point.
AlanD
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Re: TEST RESTORE IFW IMAGE

Postby RockE » Mon Oct 07, 2019 9:51 am

I learned to trust creating images a few decades ago. I overcame my initial hesitation by (1) buying a spare disk like my boot drive, (2) buying an external drive to store images on, (3) creating an image of my boot drive (into a folder on my external drive), (4) restoring the image to my new spare drive, and (5) swapping the spare drive for the boot drive. When the system booted off of the newly restored drive I became a "believer" in imaging.
If you aren't prepared to invest in hardware (and TeraByte software?) in order to support imaging yoour system(s) then you need to hire someone to do it for you.
When initiating someone new into the "imaging habit" I show them how to image their systems themselves.
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