Disable Fastboot

User discussion and information resource forum for Image products.

Re: Disable Fastboot

Postby timg11 » Fri Sep 30, 2016 6:15 am

I have read the forum notice - that's what prompted my question. The notice says "It appears that Windows does not clear its cache and remount file systems after resuming from hibernation."

Previously, Terabyte Support said "the fastboot issue has to do with windows in general." Bob Coleman added "if multiple OSs with fastboot enabled have access to the same drive/partition..."

To clarify the specific case I'm asking about, consider the following:
1) IFW is installed on a Windows 10 machine - Windows is the only OS present.
2) IFW is run as a scheduled task, and regularly creates images with VSS or PHYLOCK, saving them to a server.
3) At some point, the drive fails.
4) A new drive is installed. The system is booted to IFL, and IFL is used to restore the image created by IFW from the server.

In that case, the image was not created from a disk that was "hibernated". It was created from a running Windows environment with IFW. So my question is, does having Fastboot enabled change the structure and organization of the disk _on_a_running_system_ in a way that prevents IFW with VSS or PHYLOCK from creating a valid image that can be successfully restored to a new drive?
timg11
 
Posts: 157
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2011 9:31 am

Re: Disable Fastboot

Postby TeraByte Support(PP) » Fri Sep 30, 2016 11:37 am

Your image creation is fine. If you only have the one Windows OS installed you can still run into issues if you use any boot media, especially if you make changes to any "open" file systems (create new files, edit files, delete files, etc.).

You may not see issues in the type of scenario you describe. However, keep in mind that it's not only the Windows partition. If you have any other partitions/disks, those are affected too. In your example, when you install the new disk and boot into Windows you may find all your other partitions have "fixes" applied due to being in a fast-boot state. Personally, I'd rather have things always shut down properly so I don't have concerns about files being lost or file system corruption.
Paul Purviance
TeraByte Support
TeraByte Support(PP)
 
Posts: 1089
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2011 5:51 pm

Re: Disable Fastboot

Postby timg11 » Fri Sep 30, 2016 1:48 pm

Thanks Paul. On one hand, it seems that for a simple Windows system (one drive, one partition, no other OS), using IFW for imaging, then the speed benefit of Fastboot would be worthwhile. I would consider it a user responsibility to shut the system down with "SHUTDOWN /S" from a command line (rather than the start menu ) to ensure a full shutdown before imaging from a "shutdown" state.

On the other hand, it seems there is really no definitive information available on how shutdown actually works, or what options do what, so maybe it is safer just to give up Fastboot?
timg11
 
Posts: 157
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2011 9:31 am

Re: Disable Fastboot

Postby mjnelson99 » Fri Sep 30, 2016 3:17 pm

I briefly had Win 10 on one laptop. I had turned off Fastboot. BUT, at
one point it got faster, bypassing the F2 & F12 when I boot up. I knew
that should not be with a regular boot. I cannot do a restore w/o access
to F2 & F12 (select boot device). It just booted into Windows.

I could get to F2 & F12 with a Restart.

Decided Win10 was a loser as far as I was concerned. I like Win 7.
Mary

On 9/30/2016 3:48 PM, timg11 wrote:
> Thanks Paul. On one hand, it seems that for a simple Windows system

(one drive, one partition, no other OS), using IFW for imaging, then the

speed benefit of Fastboot would be worthwhile. I would consider it a user

responsibility to shut the system down with "SHUTDOWN /S" from a
command line

(rather than the start menu ) to ensure a full shutdown before imaging
from a "shutdown" state.
>
> On the other hand, it seems there is really no definitive information available on how shutdown actually works, or what options do what, so maybe it is safer just to give up Fastboot?
>
>
mjnelson99
 
Posts: 762
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2011 6:24 pm

Previous

Return to Image for DOS/Linux/Windows