How-To Guides

Introduction

The How-To Guides are categorized into sections below. Each section can be expanded or collapsed by clicking the plus or minus button on the section header bar. You can also quickly jump to a section by placing the mouse over any header bar and clicking on a Jump to link.

  

Example: Simple Operations Backup and Restore

Backup: Using Image for Windows (video)

Simple operations is the perfect mode for those who need a simple backup and restore. This video takes you through enabling simple operations and creating a backup.

Restore: Using Image for Linux (video)

Restoring a simple operations backup is as easy as creating it. Watch this video to learn how to use the Image for Linux recovery media to restore a backup created using simple operations.

Example: Normal Backup and Restore

Backup: Using Image for Windows (video)

The normal backup process gives you complete control over your backup. Watch how a full backup is done using Image for Windows.

Restore: Using Image for Linux (video)

Here you are taken through the process of restoring a backup using the Image for Linux recovery media.

Example: Virtual Machine Creation

Create a Virtual Machine from a Physical Machine using CopyP2V (video)

Image for Windows and the Operating System Deployment (OSD) Tool Suite provide all the software you need to copy your physical machine to a virtual machine.  This video shows you how to use the copyp2v.tbs script to copy a physical machine to a VirtualPC machine (the use of copyp2v.tbs in this video also applies when using VMWare instead of VIrtualPC). The copyp2v.tbs script is included wtih the OSD Tool Suite Professional version which is included in the full version of the Image for Windows.   The use of copyp2v.tbs supersedes the methods given in the other videos.

Create a VMWare Workstation Machine from a Physical Machine (video)

This tutorial is obsolete and provided for historical reference only.  This video will show how you can use the OSDTOOL.TBS script to easily convert Windows to run on alternate hardware. It also shows how you can use Image for Windows and the OSD Tool Suite to move a physical Windows machine to VMWare Workstation.

Create a VirtualPC Machine from a Physical XP Machine (video)

This tutorial is obsolete and provided for historical reference only.  Image for Windows and the Operating System Deployment (OSD) Tool Suite provide all the software you need to copy your physical machine to a VirtualPC machine.  This video shows you one of the ways that you can restore a Windows XP Pro image created on a physical machine to a VirtualPC machine even though the physical machine is not compatible with the VirtualPC machine.

Create a VirtualPC Machine from a Physical Vista Machine (video)

This tutorial is obsolete and provided for historical reference only.  Image for Windows and the Operating System Deployment (OSD) Tool Suite provide all the software you need to copy your physical machine to a VirtualPC machine.  This video shows you one of the ways that you can restore a Windows Vista image created on a physical machine to a VirtualPC machine even though the physical machine is not compatible with the VirtualPC machine.

Example: Restoring to Dissimilar Hardware

Restoring to dissimilar hardware using Image for Linux (video)

This sample shows how the full version of Image for Linux and the OSDTOOL script can be used to restore Windows to different hardware. This example migrates a Dell R610 server running Windows Server 2003 to a HP GL360 G7 server. Note: parts of the video are hard to see due to the color contrast and the loss of detail that results from producing a video that isn't too large.

Installing Windows Drivers with TBOSDT for DOS/TBOS (html)

This tutorial is obsolete and provided for historical reference only. You normally have to do what Microsoft calls in "In Place Upgrade" of Windows before it will boot properly on a system containing different hardware than Windows was originally installed on. This can occur when you move a hard drive from one system  to another or when you restore a drive image of Windows to another system. This tutorial covers a method whereby you can install Windows drivers without having to do an In Place Upgrade. While it specifically covers installing a Windows XP storage driver using the DOS/TBOS version of TBOSDT from a bootable USB flash drive, the basis of this tutorial can be used to create a universal  restore solution for IT shops and consultants.

Installing Windows Drivers from a Network Share using TBOSDT included with Image for Linux (html)

This tutorial is obsolete and provided for historical reference only. This tutorial covers the same topic as the one above, except using a Network Share and the Linux version of TBOSDT included on the Image for Linux boot disk.

Please note that while many of the videos and tutorials below were created for BootIt Next Generation, the concepts and procedures still apply to BootIt Bare Metal.

Installation Step 1: Creating the Installation Media from Windows (video)

The video takes you through the process of creating the boot media for BootIt Next Generation. It covers using makedisk.exe from Windows. Windows x64 users must use the makedisk utility to create the boot media.

Installation Step 2: Installing BootIt Next Generation to the Hard Drive (video)

Once you have your installation boot media created you can then proceed to install BootIt Next Generation to your hard drive. This video shows you how that is done even when there is no existing unpartitioned free space.

Example of how to Resize Partitions (video)

BootIt Next Generation fully supports non-destructive resizing of standard FAT/FAT32/NTFS partitions. Watch this video to grasp the concepts and see it in action.

Installing Windows 7 to its Own Primary Partition (video)

The best way to run Windows 7 is directly on your hardware.  By running Windows 7 directly on your hardware along side your existing operating system, you can ensure Windows 7 stability, compatibility, and functionality meets your needs while still being able to boot into your existing operating system.  You'll also be able to migrate over to Windows 7 at your own pace while continuing to use your existing Windows operating system.  This video shows you how to add Windows 7 to your existing computer system while retaining your current Windows operating system.  If you need to burn the Windows 7 ISO download to a DVD, you can use the free TeraByte BurnCDCC utility available on the free downloads webpage.

Installing Windows Vista to its Own Primary Partition (video)

Installation video showing how to install Windows Vista to its own primary partition while using BootIt Next Generation. The basic concepts of this video can be applied to any OS install.

Installing Windows XP to its Own Primary Partition (video)

Watch the process of installing Windows XP to its own primary partition while using BootIt Next Generation. The basic concepts of this video can be applied to any OS install. If you have a newer system using SATA/AHCI drives then you may also be interested in the Create a Windows XP Slipstreamed Disc with SATA Drivers tutorial found in the General category.

Installing Windows 98 to its Own Primary Partition (video)

Video showing how to install Windows 98 to its own primary partition while using BootIt Next Generation. The basic concepts of this video can be applied to any OS install.

Creating and Booting a second copy of Windows XP (video)

Shows you how to make a bootable copy of an existing Windows XP partition. The basic concepts of this video apply to copying any OS partition, but it goes into detail on how the boot items in BootIt and the Windows boot.ini file are related and the causes behind various Windows NTLDR error messages.

Upgrading a Copy of Windows XP to Windows Vista (video)

This video takes you through making a copy of Windows XP and upgrading it to Windows Vista. When completed you'll have the ability to boot either XP or Vista.

Prevent Losing Vista Restore Points when Multi-Booting with Windows XP (video)

Normally, dual-booting Vista and XP results in Vista Restore Points being lost. However, as this video shows, BootIt Next Generation can help you prevent this from happening.

Adding Windows 2000 to a Windows 9x System (pdf)

This tutorial contains the concept of adding an operating system to its own primary partition. For the purpose of this tutorial the system is assumed to have a single Windows 9x or ME partition that occupies the entire hard drive. It takes you through installation of BootIt Next Generation to its own dedicated partition, installation of Windows 2000 to its own partition, and how to keep the Windows 9x/ME and Windows 2000 data separate from each other.

Installing Windows 9x/ME using the Multi-OS feature (pdf)

This tutorial contains the concept of adding an operating system to another drive letter using the BootIt Next Generation Multi-OS feature. For the purposes of this tutorial the system is assumed to contain Windows 98 installed to a primary partition and an extended partition with one volume (logical drive D:). It takes you through the process of installing BootIt Next Generation to a shared partition and installing Windows ME to the D: drive.

Installation: Image for Windows (video)

Shows you how to install Image for Windows to your computer.

Image for Windows First Things First – Make a Boot Disk (html)

Creating a recovery boot disk that will allow you to restore your system is one thing you should do before using Image for Windows.  If you have a newer system running Windows 8 or later then you should  create an Image for Linux or Image for Windows (WinRE/WinPE) boot disk covered in other tutorials.  This tutorial takes you through the process of creating an Image for DOS boot disk.

Image for Windows – Creating a WinRE Disc or UFD Containing Image for Windows (TBWinRE) (html)

Starting with Windows 7 you can create a bootable Image for Windows recovery CD/DVD/BD or UFD based on the Windows built-in Recovery Environment without having to downloading the Windows AIK.  This step-by-step tutorial instructs you on how to do it.

Image for Windows – Creating a WinPE Disc or UFD Containing Image for Windows (TBWinPE) (html)

If your Windows version doesn't include the files needed to create the WinRE disc above then you can use the Windows AIK to create a boot disk.  This tutorial takes you step-by-step through the process of creating an Image for Windows boot disk using the downloadable Windows AIK.

TBWinPE/RE Builder – Settings Overview (html)

This tutorial explains the settings available for the TBWinPE/RE Builder used to build the TBWinRE or TBWinPE boot media above.

Image for Windows – Creating a BartPE Disk Containing Image for Windows (html)

As an additional option, you can use a free third party product to create a Windows XP based boot disk that runs Image for Windows.  This tutorial takes you through that simple process.  

Image for Windows – Creating a VistaPE Disk Containing Image for Windows (html)

As an additional option, you can use a free third party product to create a Windows Vista based boot disk that runs Image for Windows.  This tutorial takes you through that process. 

Image for Windows – Creating a Win7RescuePE Disk Containing Image for Windows (html)

This tutorial is obsolete and provided for historical reference only.  You can use a free third party product to create a Windows 7 based boot disk that runs Image for Windows.  This tutorial takes you through that process.

Image for Windows – Making a Full Backup (html)

This tutorial walks you through one of the most common scenarios—backing up to an external, USB-connected hard drive.

Image for Windows – Restoring a Full Drive Backup Using a Windows Boot Disk (html)

Because you can't use Image for Windows to restore over a Windows Operating System that is in use, you will normally restore a full drive backup image using an Image for DOS or Image for Linux boot disk.  However, you can also use Image for Windows on a boot disk to perform the restore (see the various "Image for Windows – Creating a Disc or UFD Containing Image for Windows" above).  This tutorial takes you through a restore using the BartPE boot disc.

Image for Linux First Things First – Make a Boot Disk (from Windows) (html)

Before you begin using Image for Linux, create a boot disk by using the Linux based makedisk script or the Windows MakeDisk utility included with Image for Linux.  This tutorial takes you through using the Windows MakeDisk utility to create a boot disk.

Image for Linux – Making a Full Drive Backup (html)

This tutorial walks you through one of the most common scenarios—backing up to an external, USB-connected hard drive.

Image for Linux - Restoring a Full Drive Backup (html)

When your hard drive fails or becomes corrupt you'll need to restore your full drive backup.  This tutorial takes you through the process of restoring a full drive backup stored on a USB-connected hard drive.

Setting up Image for Linux on a Linux Distribution (html)

Image for Linux includes a Linux setup script for installing on a running Linux distribution.  Once installed on a Linux distribution, you can create customized boot disks or use it to back up and restore un-mounted partitions without rebooting.  This how-to document shows you the basics of installing Image for Linux from within Linux.

Make a Boot Disk from a Linux Distribution (html)

Before you begin using Image for Linux, create a boot disk by using the Linux based makedisk script or the Windows MakeDisk utility included with Image for Linux.  This tutorial takes you through using the Linux makedisk script to create a boot disk.

Running Image for Linux Without a Boot Disk (html)

Typically, to run Image for Linux, you would create a bootable USB flash drive (UFD) or CD/DVD disc and boot from that media. This guide will describe a method for running Image for Linux (IFL) without a boot disk.

Create an IFL Restore Disc on a USB Flash Drive (html)

Restore discs are typically created by either following the steps in burn_restore_disc.txt located in the Image for Linux help folder, or by burning an image directly to CD/DVD/BD (the program automatically sets up the first disc to boot and restore the image from it). This tutorial takes through the steps to create the same type of recovery boot disc, only using UFD as the boot medium.

Backing up to a network share (pdf)

Takes you through the process of backing up an entire drive to an existing network share using Image for Linux.

Image for DOS First Things First – Make a Boot Disk (html)

Before you begin using Image for DOS, create a boot disk by using the MakeDisk utility included with Image for DOS.  This tutorial takes you through that simple process.

Image for DOS - Making a Full Drive Backup (html)

This tutorial walks you through one of the most common scenarios—backing up to an external, USB-connected hard drive.

Image for DOS - Restoring a Full Drive Backup (html)

When your hard drive fails or becomes corrupt you'll need to restore your full drive backup.  This tutorial takes you through the process of restoring a full drive backup stored on a USB-connected hard drive.

Running Image for DOS Without a Boot Disk (html)

Typically, to run Image for DOS, you would create a bootable floppy diskette, USB flash drive, or CD/DVD disc, and then boot from that media. This guide will describe a method for running Image for DOS (IFD) without a boot disk.

Create a Windows XP Slipstreamed Disc with SATA Drivers (html)

Shows how you can use a free third party utility named nLite to create an Windows XP Slipstreamed Disc to contain any service packs or special drivers needed for your system. This is particularly useful for user who have a new computer system running Windows Vista and want to use BootIt Next Generation to dual-boot both Windows XP and Windows Vista.